This blog has nothing to do with flowers, but as a florist, we work day in and day out with brides, party and shower hostesses, and event planners who all rely on the ever-important (but often neglected) RSVP. Just consider this a public service announcement: RSVPs are important!

Everyone who has hosted an event can relate. The non-RSVPers wonder, “what’s the big deal?” You know who you are. Let’s focus on why it is a big deal to RSVP when it is requested. This applies to weddings, showers, parties, and any event where RSVP appears on the invitation. It isn’t simply a matter of etiquette, or an antiquated concept; it has very practical implications.

In our business, we hear stories of frustration over getting a reliable head count. Brides and their parents are working with a budget. If they serve a meal, they have to give a count to the caterer. They have to tell the venue how many tables and chairs are needed. The list can go on to include china, glassware, linens, centerpieces and a multitude of rented items.  Likewise, party hostesses are purchasing food, beverages, and party favors, and planning things like seating and activities with no idea how many will attend. In some cases, a host makes lodging and transportation arrangements for potential guests from out of town. As you can imagine, it is difficult to successfully plan without a commitment from the guests.

Fear of Commitment?

I’ve asked myself why people seem to disregard an RSVP request. Is it a generational thing? Is it reluctance to commit? Too much trouble? I can’t really blame this one on the Millennials. No one seems immune. It isn’t a time-consuming task. In most cases, hosts make it pretty easy to RSVP. In the case of less formal invitations, like E-vites and Facebook events, it is as simple as the click of a mouse. Printed invitations almost always include a response card, as well as a stamped and addressed envelope for mailing. Short of making personal phone calls and text inquiries (and I know some who have had to resort to this), what does a host have to do?

That leaves the commitment excuse. “I’m just not sure what I will be doing three weeks from Saturday, so I just won’t commit. If it turns out I’m free, I’ll make an appearance. If not, they won’t be expecting me.” Make no mistake, an RSVP is a commitment. Anyone who has planned a wedding knows the angst of creating a guest list. Tough decisions are made. Distant cousins twice-removed are crossed off, while Uncle Jim and his plus-one make the cut. If you were so fortunate as to make the cut,  Répondez s’il vous plaît (RSVP). Make the commitment, take the plunge, show up. Put it on your calendar and protect that date.

Regrets

If you have a conflict, decline promptly, or send your regrets. You aren’t required to give an explanation, but you might offer a brief note expressing gratitude for the invitation and indicating the reason you are unable to attend. E-vite and Facebook invitations allow you to straddle the fence with a “Maybe” response option. Whenever possible, however, make a decision and let the host know. You just might open up a spot for one of those distant cousins who is dying to attend.

Respect the Guest List

I am dating myself with this bit, but “back in the day” when I got married, the ceremony was in the church sanctuary followed by a reception in the church’s fellowship hall. Yes, we requested RSVPs on the invitations, but it was just to have a ballpark estimate of how many to expect. How many did my cake need to serve? How many cups of punch would we need? It didn’t really matter if someone brought an extra guest or two along.

Today’s weddings are a little (a lot) more complex, from venues to menus. For reasons previously mentioned, it is imperative to have an accurate count of guests. Apart from the price tag attached to each guest, the bride and groom have chosen the friends and family they want with them on their special day. Respect that. The names on the invitation envelope are the parties invited. Period. If your name is the only one that appears, you are going solo.

A Few “Don’ts” and a “Do”

For some this may seem like common sense; for others, it may as well be Greek. So, it bears pointing out. Don’t assume they are fine with you bringing your children along. If your invited spouse or date can’t make it, don’t feel free to substitute another guest. Don’t put them on the spot and ask if you can bring your sister who happens to be in town that day, or worse yet, just bring your sister without asking. There will be no place card at the table with her name on it. Awkward!  Perhaps your invitation will be addressed to you “and guest.” In that case, by all means, bring a date or a friend. The host has graciously allowed you a plus-one.

Who Should RSVP?

Everyone. Even if you are part of the wedding party, you need to RSVP. If you verbally told the host over lunch two weeks ago that you planned to attend, you still need to RSVP. Never assume the host knows you plan to attend.

You don’t have to read up on your Emily Post Rules of Etiquette, or seek the advice of Dear Abby or Miss Manners. You don’t need fancy words, or creative writing skills. It’s as simple as “yes” or “no,” “accept” or “decline.” Check a box or click on the screen. At the end of the day, it’s really a matter of showing respect and courtesy to the host/hostess, who was kind enough to invite you to join in their celebration.

The ’80s called and they want to back in. No problem! Who doesn’t love a good throw-back? This year, look for a number of wedding trends that pay homage to the past… like, totally.

Cascading Bouquets

If you are old enough to remember 1981, chances are you were parked in front of a television watching Lady Diana Spencer marry Prince Charles in July of that year. Diana’s wedding style sparked trends across the bridal industry, including puffy sleeves, mile-long trains, cathedral-length veils, and the cascading bouquet.

The newlywed princess’ large cascading bouquet featured white orchids, gardenias, roses, freesia, stephanotis and ivy

Today’s version of the cascade bouquet is less structured, more haphazard and “undone.” The cascade effect can be created with flowers or greenery, including ivy, trumpet vine, eucalyptus, berries, jasmine or wispy ferns.

Modern take on the cascading bouquet trend
Source: The Knot
Photo credit: Swan Photography
Source: David Austin Roses Facebook

There is another royal wedding just weeks away. The highly anticipated event is sure to ignite a number of bridal trends. Stay tuned!

Old-Fashioned Flowers

Garden flowers that might be considered old-fashioned are in vogue. Showy and versatile dahlias are replacing peonies as the “it” flower in bridal bouquets and arrangements. Zinnias and chrysanthemums also make the list. Chrysanthemums, often associated with autumn, are available year-round in a variety of colors. Brides are selecting blooms that convey a fresh-picked from the garden appearance.  Most garden-style flowers are locally-sourced, which make them an economical option as well.

Martha Stewart Weddings’ bouquet features two trends: cascading design and dahlias.
Bright zinneas give traditional roses and hydrangeas a more organic, garden-style vibe.

Trends that Come Full Circle

Wreaths and flower crowns are back, with a modern twist. You can still use wreaths as door decorations, but there are many other uses. Floral wreaths encircle the wedding cake, accent light fixtures, and serve as aisle markers. Flower crowns are not just for the flower girls. Brides have adapted the trend for their own wedding day look. Some opt to wear them as headpieces, while others carry them in place of a traditional bouquet.  Don’t forget the pets! Our furry friends can be as festive as the rest of the bridal party with a coordinating floral collar.

      

Although elements of the ’80s are circling back around, few brides want a full-blown, “to the max,” retro wedding.  Pick and choose among the trends to give a subtle nod to the era. Today’s brides are embracing the past, but putting a fresh spin on these old favorites.  If you are planning nuptials in the coming year, let Lilium help you incorporate the latest trends into your special day.

 

The holidays are barely behind us, but we are headed full-steam toward Valentine’s Day. In the world of sports, all eyes turn to the Super Bowl February 4 and the Olympic Games on February 9. In the flower game, however, the biggest event of the year happens a few days later on February 14. Whether you mark the day with cards, flowers or candy, Valentine’s Day is one of the most anticipated (and sometimes dreaded) days of the year.  In honor of the big day, we thought we’d share a few fun facts about Valentine’s Day.

There was more than one Saint Valentine, but the one most associated with Valentine’s Day is the one who defied Emperor Claudius II by helping couples to marry in secret. The emperor felt single men made better soldiers, and forbade them to marry, but Valentine was sympathetic to their plight. Valentine’s actions cost him his head, but he is immortalized centuries later as we celebrate love. Isn’t that romantic?

Nothing takes you back to those classroom Valentine’s Day parties like a box of conversation hearts. Invented in 1866, Necco (New England Confectionery Company) now produces 8 billion conversation hearts each year. Production continues year-round to meet the February demand. Each box contains assorted messages (50-60 different ones are produced each year), including current references like, “IM Me.” If you have a few boxes left once Valentine’s Day has passed, don’t worry. They have a shelf life of five years!

       

Vernona, Italy, home of William Shakespeare’s fictional lovers Romeo and Juliet, receives approximately 1000 letters addressed to Juliet each year. Letters to Juliet are answered by members of the Club di Guilietta, who take their task very seriously.

Casa di Guiletta in Verona
Visitors to Casa di Guilietta leave behind love notes

 

Overall, $18.2 billion is spent on Valentine’s Day each year. The average man spends $150; the average woman spends $74. Approximately 9 million people will purchase a Valentine gift for a pet.

Hallmark began mass-producing Valentine’s Day greeting cards in 1913. Today, approximately $1 billion is spent on Valentines, making it the second largest card-giving occasion, behind Christmas. According to Hallmark, 50% of the US population purchases Valentine’s Day greeting cards. Of that number, half are purchased in the six days prior to February 14. Procrastinate much?

Hallmark's popup flower bouquet

Hallmark Valentine                                   

Chocolates are a favorite gift choice for Valentine’s Day. We often see those heart-shaped boxes on retail shelves before the Christmas clearance signs even go up. Why chocolates? Historians tell us that physicians in the 1800s advised their patients to eat chocolate to calm their pinings for lost love. Chocolate increases the brain’s level of serotonin,  the feel-good chemical. In the mid-1800s, Richard Cadbury produced the first box of chocolates specifically for Valentine’s Day. He designed the heart-shaped boxes himself, adorned with roses and Cupids. Whether we purchase the chocolate to celebrate love, or mourn the lack of it, Americans spend $1 billion on Valentine’s Day chocolates each year.

Flowers remain the most popular expression of Valentine’s Day affection, with red roses topping the list of romantic blooms. Americans will purchase 220 million stems of roses for their Valentines this year.

The tradition of sending flowers comes from a custom of using non-verbal methods of communication. Looking back to the 1800s once again, specific flowers were assigned meanings to convey certain sentiments. Years later, we still honor many of the sentiments attached to our favorite blooms. The classic red rose symbolizes love, beauty, romance and perfection. Tulips stand for perfect love. Peonies are most often associated with romance and bashfulness, with some believing they bring good luck.

Corazon roses from Rio Roses, premium blue-ribbon roses, are known for their large, long-lasting blooms.

 

Tulips from Holland represent perfect love.
Fan-favorite peonies are not officially in season, but a few lucky florists will have them in stock.

Weekday Valentine’s Days are the busiest for florists, as people take advantage of sending flowers to their loved ones at work. With Valentine’s Day falling on Wednesday this year, consider sending an arrangement early in the week. You will get the best selection of flowers before the rush, and the recipient will be the first in the office to receive flowers (making them the envy of their co-workers, and making you the hero).

When it comes to sending flowers, anything goes! According to the Society of American Florists (SAF), about one third of women send flowers to their husbands or boyfriends. No significant other in your life this year? SAF says that about 20% of women will send flowers to themselves for Valentine’s Day. #wewontjudgeyou

Whether you are celebrating with your sweetheart, or celebrating single-hood, have a  Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

 

 

 

 

The color experts at the Pantone Color Institute have named their Color of the Year for 2018: Ultra Violet. The annual announcement is much-anticipated by designers, manufacturers and trend watchers throughout the country. The chosen color influences fashion, cosmetics, and all things for the home, from paint to textiles, furnishings to florals. Ultra Violet (Pantone 18-3838) is a celestial shade of purple, that falls on the cooler end of the spectrum. It calls to mind  the vastness of the galaxy and all its mysteries.

Ultra Violet influences across multiple categories

Pantone’s Power

Pantone is synonymous with color for a vast array of industries, but it started in the printing industry. They developed an innovative color matching system in 1962, including a swatch book, that ensures colors chosen would match from one print job to the next. The idea spread to include other industries, including plastics, digital technology, fashion and home. As the existing standard for accurate color communication, their color of the year selection becomes more influential with each passing year.

Ultra Violet dominates graphic design and packaging.
Ultra Violet influences beauty products

When choosing the annual color of the year, Pantone experts consider influences from fashion, film, technology, art and travel. They visit venues and events all over the world, including art shows, auto shows, and world events like the Olympic Games, making note of how color is being used.

Pop culture also influences the choice. For example, musical icons Prince, David Bowie and Jimi Hendrix have often been associated with shades of purple. The color evokes creativity and originality. It is also associated with royalty, wealth and complexity.

We are living in a time that requires inventiveness and imagination. It is the kind of creative inspiration that is indigenous to PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet, a blue-based purple that takes our awareness and potential to a higher level. From exploring new technologies and the greater galaxy, to artistic expression and spiritual reflection, intuitive Ultra Violet lights the way to what is yet to come.Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute

Purple Pairings

The shade has both warm and cool tones in it, which makes it versatile. Ultra Violet blends well with other shades of purple, and also serves as a strong complementary color. Suggested palettes include:

 

 

Purple Reigns

In the floral industry, purples are popular for all occasions, but there is definitely a trend toward purple for weddings. Flowers in shades of purple are available in abundance, and, as you can see from the suggested palettes above, they pair well with many other hues a bride might want to include.

Ultra Violet can be incorporated into floral arrangements for any occasion. It can be either masculine or feminine, so it is a very versatile color. Flowers that capture the spirit of the 2018 Pantone color of the year include calla lilies, hydrangea, dahlias, lisianthus, zinnias, asters, roses, scabiosa, lilacs, chrysanthemums, delphinium, hyacinth, orchids, stock, violets and tulips.

Stop by Lilium or visit our website at www.liliumflorals.com to explore your passion for purple, and visit the Pantone Color Institute website at www.pantone.com to read more about this year’s pick.

 

Funerals are not generally at the top of the list of conversation topics, yet we all have to experience them sooner or later. While this is the season of giving thanks and celebrating family, death does not acknowledge any particular season. It is a difficult time, when we are often at a loss as to what to say or do. Whether planning a funeral for a loved one, or expressing condolences to a family member, friend, or business associate, flowers are a traditional expression of sympathy.

The use of flowers in funeral rites goes way back; I mean WAY back. Excavations of ancient burial sites in Iraq have unearthed evidence of plants and florals surrounding the human remains. Without getting too morbid or graphic, before modern day embalming methods were available, flowers were used to mask the odors of the deceased until burial took place. Although that is not an issue today, the tradition of surrounding the casket with flowers endures.

In the early 1900s, C. Austin Miles wrote the hymn, “In the Garden,” which became one of the most frequently-sung hymns at funerals all over the United States. The visual was so strong that funeral homes designed their facilities so that caskets would sit among flowers and plants to create the illusion of resting in a garden. The tradition endures more than 100 years later. A background of flowers lends warmth and beauty to the funeral service, creating a comforting environment for the bereaved.

white and green easel spray
White and Green Easel Spray

Flowers are often given to express sentiments we have difficulty putting into words. If fact, when Lilium customers order sympathy flowers,  writing the card message is often more difficult than selecting flowers. Flowers are a visual expression of love, sympathy and respect. They indicate a shared burden of grief. While some flowers have symbolic meanings, most select flowers that best reflect the personality or preferences of the deceased, or convey particular sentiments to the family. White, particularly a white lily, is most often associated with sympathy flowers. White is also a versatile choice for either a man or woman. Alternatively, color palettes can be selected for a more feminine or masculine look. However, it is not necessary to use somber colors. Many choose to view the funeral as a celebration of the life of their loved one, and select bright colors for the service.

Casket Flowers

Typically, casket flowers are purchased by the family of the deceased, and they are placed on top of the casket at the viewing/visitation and during the service. A full casket cover will cover the entire top of the casket. This works best if the casket will remain closed. If the casket will be open, a half casket cover is recommended. It can be easily moved to one end when the casket is open, then moved back to the center once the casket is closed.

White and Green Casket Cover
Vibrant Casket Cover
Rose Casket Cover

Easel Sprays

Easel sprays are used at formal funerals, memorial services and graveside services. Following an indoor service, they generally accompany the casket from the funeral to the grave site, and remain there after the burial.

There are several options for easel sprays, including traditional (or blanket) sprays, wreaths, crosses, and more modern, asymmetrical sprays. Flowers can range from traditional roses to vibrant tropicals. They can be designed to be feminine, or with masculine colors and textures.

Feminine Cross Spray
Sympathy Easel Spray
Tropical Easel Spray

Plants

If you want to send something longer-lasting, plants are a good option. You should take into account whether or not the family is local, with the ability to easily transport the plants home.  If so, you might choose a single, large plant in a nice container, or perhaps a European garden. The European garden is an assortment of flowering and non-flowering plants arranged in a basket, and finished with moss and, sometimes, curly willow. You get the best of both worlds, with a colorful blooms in a long-lasting arrangement. Flower and plant options will vary by season, so check with your florist to find out what is available.

Sympathy European Garden
Spring European Garden

A potted orchid is another beautiful choice. A fresh orchid’s blooms may last two to three months with proper care. Lilium dresses up their orchids in a decorative container with moss and curly willow. An orchid can also be included in a European garden to create a stunning and long-lasting arrangement.

Double Stemmed potted orchid

Fresh Arrangements

A fresh arrangement is always an appropriate expression of sympathy. Have an arrangement delivered to a residence, workplace, or to the funeral service. Like plants, vased arrangements can be taken home after the service and enjoyed for several days. Designs range from low and lush bouquets to tall and stately arrangements. Whites and greens are often requested for sympathy arrangements, but there is no right or wrong color scheme. You can specify a favorite flower, or color palette, that best expresses your sentiments.

Please visit our website to see options for sympathy flowers. Lilium is a custom shop, and we will work with you to select a meaningful arrangement to express your condolences.

Not born with a green thumb? If you choose to grow succulents, your lack of aptitude with plants will be your little secret. Succulents are easy to plant, easy to maintain, and easy to incorporate into any decor. Plus, there are hundreds of varieties of succulents from which to choose, making endless creative possibilities.

SUCCULENTS ARE LOW MAINTENANCE

By definition, succulents are drought resistant plants that store water in their leaves, stems and roots. The storage of water gives them a fleshy appearance, known as succulence. While you can’t forget about them completely, they need very little attention. To create a low maintenance arrangement, make a little effort up front. Make sure the plants have good drainage. You can purchase cactus soil, or add sand or gravel to ordinary potting soil. Be sure your container has a hole in the bottom for drainage.

Succulents are slow-growing plants, so place them tightly together in the container. After planting, water well, then allow the soil to dry out between watering. Over watering is the most common mistake made by plant owners. Succulents do not like to sit in water. They need more water in the spring and summer, but less in the winter when they enter a dormant phase.

Succulent arrangement
Lilium created this long-lasting botanical arrangement using finger cactus and assorted succulents.

SUCCULENTS COME IN MANY VARIETIES

There are few categories of plants with greater variety than succulents. From tall and spikey to low and mounded, from vibrant greens to pinks and reds, with and without stripes, some blooming, some cascading.  Many varieties are prolific reproducers, with offshoots called pups. If your container becomes overcrowded, simply pinch off the pups.

Burro's Tail Succulents
Burro’s Tail

 

Hens and Chicks Succulents
Red beauty Hens and Chicks
Trachyandra succulents
Trachyandra

 

Propagating  succulents is as painless as maintaining them. Remove cuttings and allow the clipped stem to dry out and form a callous. Then, simply place the cutting into prepared soil. New roots will grow, and you will have a brand new plant.

SUCCULENTS MAKE HIGH IMPACT DISPLAYS

Because of the vast array of colors and textures, succulents look great when displayed individually or in a collection of plants. They are so versatile, however, that they fit right in with traditional florals. They can channel fun and funky, contemporary, or soft and elegant. Succulents give an interesting twist to cut flower arrangements or traditional plant baskets.

 

Vased arrangement with succulents
Succulents make beautiful additions to cut flower arrangements.
Succulent arrangement
Multiple varieties of succulents combine to create a striking arrangement.

The sky is the limit when selecting a container to display your plants. You might choose a traditional pot, urn, bucket, bowl, wooden box, wall vase, or a more unconventional vessel like a sea shell, bird bath or hollow log. Any container will do, as long as it provides adequate drainage. Succulents lend themselves to many different styles from rustic to contemporary.

Finish off your display by adding “mulch” of polished river rocks, colored aquarium gravel, pea gravel, sea glass, marbles or moss. With minimal attention, your succulent garden will thrive. For more information on creating a succulent bowl, or a fresh arrangement using succulents, contact Lilium at 817-481-1565.

We live in the age of online shopping. Most everything we might need is available with a few keystrokes. The lure of Amazon Prime, with a multitude of merchandise options and free delivery beckons. No traffic, no parking hassles, no crowds. Why, then, would we choose to shop locally? Why pick up the phone and call, or even better, why visit a retailer in person? There are several great reasons:

Support the Local Economy

Keeping your shopping dollars in your community is one of the best reasons to shop locally. The taxes you pay go back to your city, allowing local government to invest back into our neighborhoods. We should note that there is a difference between shopping local and shopping locally.  You might pat yourself on the back for skipping the e-tailer, yet you complete your shopping list at a major chain, or big-box, store. While these stores do employ local citizens and collect local sales tax, much of the revenue goes outside the community.

According to Forbes magazine,

For every dollar spent at a locally-owned establishment, nearly 45% of that revenue stayed in the local community, with another 9% going elsewhere within the state. In contrast, for every dollar spent at a chain store, only 14% of the revenue stayed in the local community, mostly in the form of payroll. The balance of that money flows to out-of-state suppliers, or back to the parent corporation.Forbes.com

By the numbers, three times as much money stays in your community when you shop at locally-owned businesses vs chain stores. When you shop locally, in essence, you are taking care of your own.

Build Relationships Locally

Those of us who remember watching Cheers on NBC a few years back, fondly recall the theme song about wanting to go “where everybody knows your name… and they’re always glad you came.” We feel good when we walk into a business and they recognize us, or remember what we like or don’t like. You can’t replace the human component.

When I walk into a favorite local restaurant for my takeout lunch, they see me coming and start making my salad. They know I want my dressing mixed in, and to leave off the ham. That they know my preferences makes me feel valued, and makes me want to return. At Lilium, we keep notes on customers’ preferences. It might be one customer who loves peonies, while another is allergic to lilies, and another whose favorite color is purple. Customers have confidence when they call that we know what they like, and will meet their expectations. If there is any issue, they know where to find us, by phone, email or in person, to resolve it.

Local is the new black

High Quality Products and Services

Despite the convenience of ordering online, or through a 1-800 number, you really have no idea of the process your merchandise will go through on its way to your doorstep. In the case of fresh flowers, the moment the stems are cut, the flowers begin to decline. The faster a cut stem is placed in water and into a cool environment, the longer it will last. Flowers ordered online and shipped often arrive in poor condition, having traveled in non-refrigerated vehicles, been jostled in a delivery truck, or left on the porch. Yes, you might save a few dollars, but the product you receive (if you receive it at all) is disappointing.

Shopping for flowers, or other perishables, in your community insures the product will arrive quickly, and will be fresh. In addition, you are more likely to get a one-of-a-kind product that will please both the sender and the recipient.

Where we shop, where we eat and have fun–all of it makes our community home. Our one-of-a-kind businesses are an integral part of the distinctive character of this place.Sustainable Connections

When you do business locally, you will generally work with people who are trained and have an understanding of the products they are selling. They will take time to get to know the customer, and make sure the customers’ needs are met. Local businesses often depend on word of mouth to grow their customer base, and will protect their reputation in the community by selling a quality product and giving good customer service.

Make a Difference, One Purchase at a Time

We may often feel helpless about making a difference in the world. There are so many global issues that are beyond our control. Where do we begin? Start from the ground up. Consider what you can do to strengthen your own community. Local retailers are invested in their communities. They are more likely to support local causes, such as schools and non-profits. Where you spend your money says a lot about what you value. Make sure you add value to your community by buying at locally-owned businesses.

 

 

A Lilium arrangement of fresh flowers makes a thoughtful gift, but sometimes our customers want to add a little something extra. Our focus is always on flowers, but we have carefully selected a handful of products to complement our fresh arrangements. So, you might choose to deliver a special gift along with your arrangement, on its own, or as part of a custom-made gift basket.

Extra Fragrance

Lafco Candles and Room Diffusers

Lilium is an official retailer of Lafco candles, made from clean-burning vegan waxes and natural essential oils, with pure cotton wicks. Their scents are created to enhance a space without being overpowering. Lafco layers the fragrance into the wax so that it can be continuously enjoyed until the last burn, usually 90-100 hours. Each candle comes in a hand-blown art glass vessel that will be a beautiful decorative piece, long after the wax has burned. The candles are packaged in a white gift box accented with black ribbon, and therefore, presentation-ready.

New Scents

In addition to customer favorites Feu de Bois/Ski House, Champagne/Penthouse, Marine/Bathroom, Seville Spice/Towne House, and Chamomile Lavender/Master Bedroom, along with holiday fragrances Tree and Golden Chestnut, we recently added several new scents:

  • Black Pomegranate/Wine Room
  • Olive Blossom/Villa
  • Lemon Verbena/Porch

Extra Lafco Black Pomegratate/Wine Room extra scentsextra scents

Lilium also carries Lafco room diffusers. Each comes with a refillable hand-blown art glass container, reeds, and a bottle of essential oil fragrance. Available fragrances include Chamomile Lavender, Champagne and Feu de Bois.

Extra scents
Lafco’s Ski House room diffuser combines the scent of burning wood with a hint of mountain spruce.

Jardin de Rochelle Aroma Porcelain Diffusers

Combine the elegance of delicate porcelain flowers with their signature scents with Jardin de Rochelle diffusers. Lilium offers chrysanthemum, peony and narcissus designs and fragrances. The porcelain flower extends down into the oil and wicks the fragrance throughout the room. The 4-ounce bottle of fragrance will last several months. Each diffuser comes packaged in a beautiful gift box.

 

Erbario Toscano Luxury Home Fragrances

Erbario Toscano is the latest addition to the Lilium lineup of luxury home fragrances. The Italian-based company strives to evoke the essence of the Tuscan region with fragrances including Black Pepper, Tuscan Berries, Lavender, Sicily Citrus and Tuscan Spring. The room diffusers are sold with a 3.38 ounce bottle of fragrance and a set of dipping sticks. Simply dip the sticks into the fragrance and allow the scent to fill the room. Flip the sticks periodically to refresh the fragrance.

Extra Luxury – Spongelle Body Products

Lilium offers Spongelle body wash-infused buffers (with or without a gift box) in French Lavender and Coconut Verbena scents. The buffers cleanse, moisturize and also rejuvenate the skin with their blend of Yuzu, Edelweiss and Vetiver Root extracts. Each buffer lasts a minimum of 14 uses.

Spongelle buffer - extra luxury
Body wash infused buffer in French Lavender

We also offer Spongelle body lotion in the same two scents. While the body buffer cleanses and refreshes, the lotion restores moisture and softness. Key ingredients include shea butter, argan oil, avocado oil, macadamia oil and vitamin E. In addition,  all Spongelle products are dermatologist tested and vegan friendly.

Spongelle lotion - extra luxury
Spongelle body lotion in Coconut Verbena

Extra Sweet – Godiva Chocolates

Godiva chocolates are recognized all over the world as the premier chocolate brand. The Draps family began making their chocolates in Brussels, Belgium more than 90 years ago. Inspired by the legend of Lady Godiva, the family named the company in her honor. To this day, the company bases their philosophy on qualities exhibited by Lady Godiva: boldness, generosity, and a pioneering spirit.

Godiva has been the official chocolatier of the Royal Court of Belgium since 1968, but you don’t have to be royal to enjoy the finest of chocolates. Lilium offers boxes of Godiva chocolates in assorted sizes, making the perfect gift to complement your floral arrangement.

Godiva chocolates - extra sweet
Assorted Belgian chocolates presented in the iconic gold Godiva gift box

Extra Plush

If you are sending flowers to welcome a new baby, celebrate a child’s birthday, or commemorate a special holiday, consider adding a super soft and sweet plush animal. Lilium is an official retailer of Jellycat soft toys. Jellycat is known for their fun original designs and the “squidginess” of luxurious materials. Most importantly, all Jellycat products meet the US Safety Standard (ASTM), and are safe for all ages.

Gray bunny - extra plush
Jellycat Bashful Bunny
tutu bunny - extra plush
Lulu Tutu Lilac Bunny

 

Extra Special

We are committed to making your gift extra special. Most of our gift add-ons will be delivered in a signature green Lilium gift bag, dressed with tissue and ribbon. We take special requests, too, so just let us know how we can make your gift perfect.

Dahlias are summer showstoppers. With blooms up to 10 inches across and a wide variety of hues, they command attention in summer gardens or added to fresh arrangements. From white and pale blush to deepest crimson and purple, dahlias offer a rainbow of options for floral designers.

Family Traits

Dahlias’ multi-layered petals provide a texture that is unique to each variety. Some feature dense cylindrical petals that resemble a honeycomb. Several varieties have long, spiked petals, while others display soft, feather-like petals. Dahlias are members of the aster family, and you may notice a family resemblance to their relatives, the sunflower, daisy, chrysanthemum and zinnia. Of the 42 varieties, the largest is the dinner plate dahlia, which is aptly named. Their blooms reach up to 10 inches across.

  

Seasonal Beauties

At Lilium, dahlias start arriving in July and generally stick around through October. They are ideal for use in arrangements for all occasions, and in wedding bouquets and centerpieces. Because they are available in such a wide range of colors and varieties, dahlias can be incorporated into almost any theme or color pallette.

Candle light, dahlias
Blush Dahlias Photo By Jason Kindig
Photo credit: Swan Photography
Photo credit: Taylor Pritchett

Dahlias Have Many Uses

The versatile dahlia is native to Mexico, where it is the national flower. It is cultivated for its beauty, and for more practical purposes as well. The dried blooms can be used for dyeing textiles. All varieties (other than white) contain mordants, which work as a dye or stain when applied to fabric.

Not only are the blooms beautiful, they are edible. In fact, the dahlia is a staple ingredient in Oaxacan cuisine. Dacopa, an intense mocha-tasting extract from the flower’s roasted tubers, is used to flavor beverages throughout Central America.

Yes, dahlias may be tasty, but we think they are just too pretty to eat. We will stick to admiring them in fresh Lilium arrangements all summer long.

 

Lilium owner, Lisa Pritchett, and lead designer, Taylor Pritchett, participated in the Fleurology Symposium in Houston this month. The symposium is a by-invitation-only event for floral designers who are part of the luxury design industry. Headlining this year’s event were two industry masters: world-renowned event designers Preston Bailey and David Beahm.

L to R: Preston Bailey, Taylor Pritchett, Lisa Pritchett and David Beahm

The three-day experience was designed to immerse the participants in the luxury event experience while increasing their knowledge base and skills. The symposium included hands-on design education, luxury event detailing and healthy business management.

Hands-on Workshops

Fleurology is not an event where attendees sit and take notes while experts show them how it’s done. Lisa and Taylor, along with 28 other designers, were actively involved in learning and putting their skills into practice. Among the workshops offered was The Sketchbook Series, led by Annie Matthew. As our wedding and event coordinator, Taylor can take this skill and incorporate it in her consultations with brides and event planners. If we don’t have a certain flower readily available to show the client, Taylor can do a quick sketch of the flower to allow the client to visualize the concept.

Fleurology sketchbook

The Tent/Large Installation workshop, presented by David Beahm Experiences,  included techniques for suspending florals from the ceiling. Another workshop, presented by Rachael Ann Lunghi of Siren Floral Co., focused on creating compote arrangements. Laura Hooper Leader and Alyssa Law of Laura Hooper Calligraphy introduced designers to the art of calligraphy. The results of the designers’ efforts came together to create a beautiful event display.

Fleurology event under a tent
Event under the tent: suspended florals, compote arrangements, and chairs personalized with calligraphy. David Beahm Experiences

  

There are many creative ways to use calligraphy to elevate the designs for wedding and event decor. It can be used for signage, place cards, programs, seating, and even the cake. The ability to use calligraphy on many surfaces allows designers endless options to personalize the event for their clients.

Taylor designed this garden-style compote arrangement, which was later used in the tent display.

Keynotes

Action-packed days were spent learning and practicing new skills. Even mealtimes were not idle. A working picnic lunch included an informational seminar on social media, personal branding and photography tips. An elegant dinner setting was the backdrop for a keynote presentation by The Knot’s Lauren Kay. She discussed the luxury market and shared her insights on the state of the industry. The final morning of the symposium, all eyes were on Preston Bailey, as he discussed the limitless possibilities of the world of flowers.

Fleurology keynote dinner
Lilium was honored to work with Michelle Frost, AIFD designer, on florals for the keynote dinner.
Fleurology Preston Bailey
World-renown wedding and event planner, Preston Bailey, shares his expertise with symposium attendees.

Lilium has always been committed to providing our clients with the freshest premium product available, but we want to pair that with offering the freshest ideas as well. We believe that time invested in the Fleurology symposium will benefit all of our customers, especially our brides and event clients.

Special thanks to Fleurology organizers, event planners Karson Butler (Emily Butler and Amber Karson), photographer Koby Brown, The Knot, and Hotel Zaza for a memorable and valuable experience.