The Pantone Color Institute has declared the color of the year for 2019: Living Coral. The vibrant, yet soothing shade is thought to represent our ever-changing environment. Look for the warm, salmon pink shade to pop up in home decor, apparel and accessories, cosmetics, housewares and paint colors.

          

The Pantone Color Institute has been selecting a single color of the year (with the exception of 2016 when two colors shared the honor) for the past 20 years. Their selection is based on careful trend analysis. They explore the entertainment industry, world-wide art collections, fashion, design, and trending travel destinations. They also consider modern lifestyles, recreation trends, and socio-economic conditions. This year, they clearly give a nod to the environment, calling attention to the preservation of our coral reefs.

Color is an equalizing lens through which we experience our natural and digital realities and this is particularly true for Living Coral. With consumers craving human interaction and social connection, the humanizing and heartening qualities displayed by the convivial Pantone Living Coral hit a responsive chord.Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute       

Influences of Technology and Advertising

The Institute’s color choice also takes into account new technologies, materials, textures, and relevant social media platforms. They carefully monitor heavy hitters in the advertising world, like Apple and Airbnb, to provide hints as to trends on the rise.

Airbnb’s recent advertising campaign, shown here in a subway car, features a background very similar to Living Coral.

Floral Implications

2018’s designated color of the year, Ultra Violet, influenced wedding florals throughout the year. Greenery, the 2017 winner, impacted wedding trends in both color and use of natural materials. We expect Living Coral will do the same. In the floral world, the shade can be found in a variety of blooms: roses, dahlias, tulips, gerbera daisies, and peonies to name a few.

Dahlias     David Austin roses

gerbera daisies Bridal bouquet of coral tulips     Coral peonies

Living Coral pairs well with both light and dark colors. In floral arrangements, it is complemented beautifully by green foliage. It is equally at home with pinks and whites, or with fellow warm colors like yellow or orange. Living Coral pops against almost any shade of blue, particularly turquoise.

Coral anthurium sits front and center in this vibrant arrangement.

 

According to Pantone’s website, “Symbolizing our innate need for optimism and joyful pursuits, PANTONE 16-1546 Living Coral embodies our desire for playful expression.” Lilium agrees with their joyous assessment.  We receive a variety of fresh flowers weekly, including blooms in the coral palette. We look forward to finding creative ways to incorporate this year’s Pantone Color of the Year into our fresh arrangements.

There is everlasting love and everlasting life, but sadly, there is no such thing as an everlasting flower.  If there is any downside to purchasing fresh cut flowers, it is the fact that they are perishable. Fresh flowers are so beautiful, we want them to stay that way as long as possible. While there is no method that will make your flowers everlasting, there are some tips that will make them longer lasting.

Location, Location, Location

When a flower is growing in the ground or container, the sun is its friend. But the moment a flower is cut, the sun and flower are no longer on speaking terms. Sunlight speeds the deterioration of cut flowers.  Place your fresh arrangement in a cool location, out of direct sunlight. In addition, make sure your flowers are not sitting directly under an air vent.

If you have a boutonniere or corsage,  store it in the refrigerator away from fruits and vegetables. An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but it makes fresh flowers sickly. Fresh fruits and veggies emit ethylene gas, which speeds up the aging process for flowers.

Water

If you are putting cut flowers into a vase, start with a fresh cut on all stems. Trim stems at an angle using sharp scissors or a sharp knife. This will help them draw water up the stem more easily. Floral stems have capillaries  that are used to draw in water. If you use a dull blade to trim stems, you are squeezing the capillaries closed, preventing the flow of water to the flower.

Start with clean water and a clean vase. Many internet sites will advise adding various elements to the water, including aspirin, sugar, bleach, vinegar, or even a penny. If you purchased your flowers locally, however, the chances are your flowers have already been treated with a natural flower food and do not benefit from any of these additives.

If you receive an arrangement already in a vase, be sure to top off the water daily, making sure all stems are submerged in the water.  For best results, pour out the water and completely replace it with clean water every two-three days.

  

Purchase Long-Lasting Varieties

At Lilium, we are often asked how long a customer can expect their flower arrangement to last. In general, five-seven days is what you can expect. Anything beyond that is a bonus. There are certain varieties, however, that are longer lasting than others. Lilies and orchids are among the varieties that stick around for a while. Tropical flowers, like ginger, heliconia, pincushions, and birds of paradise can last up to two weeks.

tropical arrangement
This arrangement is created using long-lasting tropicals, including cymbidium orchids, mink protea and monstera leaves
Ginger, heliconia. anthurium and mokara orchids fresh from Maui make a striking and long-lasting arrangement

 

Hydrangea is one of the most popular blooms used in fresh arrangements, but tends to be high maintenance. One of its unique characteristics is that it drinks from its petals as well as its stem. If you have a hydrangea that looks sickly, try submerging it (head and all) under water for a few minutes and it will perk back up.

Reliable Roses

There is a misconception that roses do not last very long. If you purchase premium roses that are cut at maturity, they will last longer. Roses cut too early will not open consistently, and their heads will droop. Lilium uses Corazon roses from Rio Roses. The Corazon is an award-winning Blue Ribbon rose with a proven track record. The blooms open 4″-5″ inches across, but in spite of the impressive show, the heads will not droop.

Reliable Roses
Corazon roses are the star of this classic rose arrangement

 

Lilium believes that educating consumers about properly caring for their arrangement or plant is an important step. We want customers to be satisfied with their purchases, while being realistic in their expectations of a perishable product. On every Lilium arrangement, potted orchid or plant, a care card is attached. In addition, care instructions are printed on the back of our message cards. We can’t prevent the demise of a cut flower, but we can work together to prolong its life.

 

The holidays are barely behind us, but we are headed full-steam toward Valentine’s Day. In the world of sports, all eyes turn to the Super Bowl February 4 and the Olympic Games on February 9. In the flower game, however, the biggest event of the year happens a few days later on February 14. Whether you mark the day with cards, flowers or candy, Valentine’s Day is one of the most anticipated (and sometimes dreaded) days of the year.  In honor of the big day, we thought we’d share a few fun facts about Valentine’s Day.

There was more than one Saint Valentine, but the one most associated with Valentine’s Day is the one who defied Emperor Claudius II by helping couples to marry in secret. The emperor felt single men made better soldiers, and forbade them to marry, but Valentine was sympathetic to their plight. Valentine’s actions cost him his head, but he is immortalized centuries later as we celebrate love. Isn’t that romantic?

Nothing takes you back to those classroom Valentine’s Day parties like a box of conversation hearts. Invented in 1866, Necco (New England Confectionery Company) now produces 8 billion conversation hearts each year. Production continues year-round to meet the February demand. Each box contains assorted messages (50-60 different ones are produced each year), including current references like, “IM Me.” If you have a few boxes left once Valentine’s Day has passed, don’t worry. They have a shelf life of five years!

       

Vernona, Italy, home of William Shakespeare’s fictional lovers Romeo and Juliet, receives approximately 1000 letters addressed to Juliet each year. Letters to Juliet are answered by members of the Club di Guilietta, who take their task very seriously.

Casa di Guiletta in Verona
Visitors to Casa di Guilietta leave behind love notes

 

Overall, $18.2 billion is spent on Valentine’s Day each year. The average man spends $150; the average woman spends $74. Approximately 9 million people will purchase a Valentine gift for a pet.

Hallmark began mass-producing Valentine’s Day greeting cards in 1913. Today, approximately $1 billion is spent on Valentines, making it the second largest card-giving occasion, behind Christmas. According to Hallmark, 50% of the US population purchases Valentine’s Day greeting cards. Of that number, half are purchased in the six days prior to February 14. Procrastinate much?

Hallmark's popup flower bouquet

Hallmark Valentine                                   

Chocolates are a favorite gift choice for Valentine’s Day. We often see those heart-shaped boxes on retail shelves before the Christmas clearance signs even go up. Why chocolates? Historians tell us that physicians in the 1800s advised their patients to eat chocolate to calm their pinings for lost love. Chocolate increases the brain’s level of serotonin,  the feel-good chemical. In the mid-1800s, Richard Cadbury produced the first box of chocolates specifically for Valentine’s Day. He designed the heart-shaped boxes himself, adorned with roses and Cupids. Whether we purchase the chocolate to celebrate love, or mourn the lack of it, Americans spend $1 billion on Valentine’s Day chocolates each year.

Flowers remain the most popular expression of Valentine’s Day affection, with red roses topping the list of romantic blooms. Americans will purchase 220 million stems of roses for their Valentines this year.

The tradition of sending flowers comes from a custom of using non-verbal methods of communication. Looking back to the 1800s once again, specific flowers were assigned meanings to convey certain sentiments. Years later, we still honor many of the sentiments attached to our favorite blooms. The classic red rose symbolizes love, beauty, romance and perfection. Tulips stand for perfect love. Peonies are most often associated with romance and bashfulness, with some believing they bring good luck.

Corazon roses from Rio Roses, premium blue-ribbon roses, are known for their large, long-lasting blooms.

 

Tulips from Holland represent perfect love.
Fan-favorite peonies are not officially in season, but a few lucky florists will have them in stock.

Weekday Valentine’s Days are the busiest for florists, as people take advantage of sending flowers to their loved ones at work. With Valentine’s Day falling on Wednesday this year, consider sending an arrangement early in the week. You will get the best selection of flowers before the rush, and the recipient will be the first in the office to receive flowers (making them the envy of their co-workers, and making you the hero).

When it comes to sending flowers, anything goes! According to the Society of American Florists (SAF), about one third of women send flowers to their husbands or boyfriends. No significant other in your life this year? SAF says that about 20% of women will send flowers to themselves for Valentine’s Day. #wewontjudgeyou

Whether you are celebrating with your sweetheart, or celebrating single-hood, have a  Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

 

 

 

 

The color experts at the Pantone Color Institute have named their Color of the Year for 2018: Ultra Violet. The annual announcement is much-anticipated by designers, manufacturers and trend watchers throughout the country. The chosen color influences fashion, cosmetics, and all things for the home, from paint to textiles, furnishings to florals. Ultra Violet (Pantone 18-3838) is a celestial shade of purple, that falls on the cooler end of the spectrum. It calls to mind  the vastness of the galaxy and all its mysteries.

Ultra Violet influences across multiple categories

Pantone’s Power

Pantone is synonymous with color for a vast array of industries, but it started in the printing industry. They developed an innovative color matching system in 1962, including a swatch book, that ensures colors chosen would match from one print job to the next. The idea spread to include other industries, including plastics, digital technology, fashion and home. As the existing standard for accurate color communication, their color of the year selection becomes more influential with each passing year.

Ultra Violet dominates graphic design and packaging.
Ultra Violet influences beauty products

When choosing the annual color of the year, Pantone experts consider influences from fashion, film, technology, art and travel. They visit venues and events all over the world, including art shows, auto shows, and world events like the Olympic Games, making note of how color is being used.

Pop culture also influences the choice. For example, musical icons Prince, David Bowie and Jimi Hendrix have often been associated with shades of purple. The color evokes creativity and originality. It is also associated with royalty, wealth and complexity.

We are living in a time that requires inventiveness and imagination. It is the kind of creative inspiration that is indigenous to PANTONE 18-3838 Ultra Violet, a blue-based purple that takes our awareness and potential to a higher level. From exploring new technologies and the greater galaxy, to artistic expression and spiritual reflection, intuitive Ultra Violet lights the way to what is yet to come.Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute

Purple Pairings

The shade has both warm and cool tones in it, which makes it versatile. Ultra Violet blends well with other shades of purple, and also serves as a strong complementary color. Suggested palettes include:

 

 

Purple Reigns

In the floral industry, purples are popular for all occasions, but there is definitely a trend toward purple for weddings. Flowers in shades of purple are available in abundance, and, as you can see from the suggested palettes above, they pair well with many other hues a bride might want to include.

Ultra Violet can be incorporated into floral arrangements for any occasion. It can be either masculine or feminine, so it is a very versatile color. Flowers that capture the spirit of the 2018 Pantone color of the year include calla lilies, hydrangea, dahlias, lisianthus, zinnias, asters, roses, scabiosa, lilacs, chrysanthemums, delphinium, hyacinth, orchids, stock, violets and tulips.

Stop by Lilium or visit our website at www.liliumflorals.com to explore your passion for purple, and visit the Pantone Color Institute website at www.pantone.com to read more about this year’s pick.

 

Funerals are not generally at the top of the list of conversation topics, yet we all have to experience them sooner or later. While this is the season of giving thanks and celebrating family, death does not acknowledge any particular season. It is a difficult time, when we are often at a loss as to what to say or do. Whether planning a funeral for a loved one, or expressing condolences to a family member, friend, or business associate, flowers are a traditional expression of sympathy.

The use of flowers in funeral rites goes way back; I mean WAY back. Excavations of ancient burial sites in Iraq have unearthed evidence of plants and florals surrounding the human remains. Without getting too morbid or graphic, before modern day embalming methods were available, flowers were used to mask the odors of the deceased until burial took place. Although that is not an issue today, the tradition of surrounding the casket with flowers endures.

In the early 1900s, C. Austin Miles wrote the hymn, “In the Garden,” which became one of the most frequently-sung hymns at funerals all over the United States. The visual was so strong that funeral homes designed their facilities so that caskets would sit among flowers and plants to create the illusion of resting in a garden. The tradition endures more than 100 years later. A background of flowers lends warmth and beauty to the funeral service, creating a comforting environment for the bereaved.

white and green easel spray
White and Green Easel Spray

Flowers are often given to express sentiments we have difficulty putting into words. If fact, when Lilium customers order sympathy flowers,  writing the card message is often more difficult than selecting flowers. Flowers are a visual expression of love, sympathy and respect. They indicate a shared burden of grief. While some flowers have symbolic meanings, most select flowers that best reflect the personality or preferences of the deceased, or convey particular sentiments to the family. White, particularly a white lily, is most often associated with sympathy flowers. White is also a versatile choice for either a man or woman. Alternatively, color palettes can be selected for a more feminine or masculine look. However, it is not necessary to use somber colors. Many choose to view the funeral as a celebration of the life of their loved one, and select bright colors for the service.

Casket Flowers

Typically, casket flowers are purchased by the family of the deceased, and they are placed on top of the casket at the viewing/visitation and during the service. A full casket cover will cover the entire top of the casket. This works best if the casket will remain closed. If the casket will be open, a half casket cover is recommended. It can be easily moved to one end when the casket is open, then moved back to the center once the casket is closed.

White and Green Casket Cover
Vibrant Casket Cover
Rose Casket Cover

Easel Sprays

Easel sprays are used at formal funerals, memorial services and graveside services. Following an indoor service, they generally accompany the casket from the funeral to the grave site, and remain there after the burial.

There are several options for easel sprays, including traditional (or blanket) sprays, wreaths, crosses, and more modern, asymmetrical sprays. Flowers can range from traditional roses to vibrant tropicals. They can be designed to be feminine, or with masculine colors and textures.

Feminine Cross Spray
Sympathy Easel Spray
Tropical Easel Spray

Plants

If you want to send something longer-lasting, plants are a good option. You should take into account whether or not the family is local, with the ability to easily transport the plants home.  If so, you might choose a single, large plant in a nice container, or perhaps a European garden. The European garden is an assortment of flowering and non-flowering plants arranged in a basket, and finished with moss and, sometimes, curly willow. You get the best of both worlds, with a colorful blooms in a long-lasting arrangement. Flower and plant options will vary by season, so check with your florist to find out what is available.

Sympathy European Garden
Spring European Garden

A potted orchid is another beautiful choice. A fresh orchid’s blooms may last two to three months with proper care. Lilium dresses up their orchids in a decorative container with moss and curly willow. An orchid can also be included in a European garden to create a stunning and long-lasting arrangement.

Double Stemmed potted orchid

Fresh Arrangements

A fresh arrangement is always an appropriate expression of sympathy. Have an arrangement delivered to a residence, workplace, or to the funeral service. Like plants, vased arrangements can be taken home after the service and enjoyed for several days. Designs range from low and lush bouquets to tall and stately arrangements. Whites and greens are often requested for sympathy arrangements, but there is no right or wrong color scheme. You can specify a favorite flower, or color palette, that best expresses your sentiments.

Please visit our website to see options for sympathy flowers. Lilium is a custom shop, and we will work with you to select a meaningful arrangement to express your condolences.

Lilium owner, Lisa Pritchett, and lead designer, Taylor Pritchett, participated in the Fleurology Symposium in Houston this month. The symposium is a by-invitation-only event for floral designers who are part of the luxury design industry. Headlining this year’s event were two industry masters: world-renowned event designers Preston Bailey and David Beahm.

L to R: Preston Bailey, Taylor Pritchett, Lisa Pritchett and David Beahm

The three-day experience was designed to immerse the participants in the luxury event experience while increasing their knowledge base and skills. The symposium included hands-on design education, luxury event detailing and healthy business management.

Hands-on Workshops

Fleurology is not an event where attendees sit and take notes while experts show them how it’s done. Lisa and Taylor, along with 28 other designers, were actively involved in learning and putting their skills into practice. Among the workshops offered was The Sketchbook Series, led by Annie Matthew. As our wedding and event coordinator, Taylor can take this skill and incorporate it in her consultations with brides and event planners. If we don’t have a certain flower readily available to show the client, Taylor can do a quick sketch of the flower to allow the client to visualize the concept.

Fleurology sketchbook

The Tent/Large Installation workshop, presented by David Beahm Experiences,  included techniques for suspending florals from the ceiling. Another workshop, presented by Rachael Ann Lunghi of Siren Floral Co., focused on creating compote arrangements. Laura Hooper Leader and Alyssa Law of Laura Hooper Calligraphy introduced designers to the art of calligraphy. The results of the designers’ efforts came together to create a beautiful event display.

Fleurology event under a tent
Event under the tent: suspended florals, compote arrangements, and chairs personalized with calligraphy. David Beahm Experiences

  

There are many creative ways to use calligraphy to elevate the designs for wedding and event decor. It can be used for signage, place cards, programs, seating, and even the cake. The ability to use calligraphy on many surfaces allows designers endless options to personalize the event for their clients.

Taylor designed this garden-style compote arrangement, which was later used in the tent display.

Keynotes

Action-packed days were spent learning and practicing new skills. Even mealtimes were not idle. A working picnic lunch included an informational seminar on social media, personal branding and photography tips. An elegant dinner setting was the backdrop for a keynote presentation by The Knot’s Lauren Kay. She discussed the luxury market and shared her insights on the state of the industry. The final morning of the symposium, all eyes were on Preston Bailey, as he discussed the limitless possibilities of the world of flowers.

Fleurology keynote dinner
Lilium was honored to work with Michelle Frost, AIFD designer, on florals for the keynote dinner.
Fleurology Preston Bailey
World-renown wedding and event planner, Preston Bailey, shares his expertise with symposium attendees.

Lilium has always been committed to providing our clients with the freshest premium product available, but we want to pair that with offering the freshest ideas as well. We believe that time invested in the Fleurology symposium will benefit all of our customers, especially our brides and event clients.

Special thanks to Fleurology organizers, event planners Karson Butler (Emily Butler and Amber Karson), photographer Koby Brown, The Knot, and Hotel Zaza for a memorable and valuable experience.

Vintage Roots

What was old is new again. As with many styles and trends, they tend to fade away only to reemerge years later in a fresh new way. Pin-on corsages gave way to wrist corsages, which are now losing favor to the up-and-coming tussie mussie.

The tussie mussie  has been around the block a few times. Originating in the Victorian era, tussie mussies were once made of herbs and flowers presented in a lace doily. The flowers were chosen to convey a subtle message, such as pink for warm affection or red for passionate love.

A Modern Take

The modern version of the tussie mussie is a charming compact bouquet tied with ribbon. The flowers are selected less for their traditional meanings and more to coordinate with a dress or theme. The tussie mussie has several advantages over the wrist corsage:

  • It is larger, and can be made using a wider variety of flowers.

  • It makes a beautiful impact in pictures, but then can be placed on the table (and not in the way when the dancing begins).
Photo credit: Shaun Menary Photography
  • Tussie mussies can be put in a vase (provided) after the event and enjoyed for several days.
Photo credit: Convey Studios

Even though the tussie mussie is larger than the wrist corsage, the price is about the same. With a wrist corsage, a good percentage of the cost is attributed to labor. It takes about 20-25 minutes to make a single corsage, as each stem is individually wrapped, then tied together. Tussie mussies can be made in half the time, with more of the budget going into the flowers and greenery. So, in essence, the tussie mussie provides more bang for the buck.

Lilium has seen more and more teens opting for a tussie mussie during the past two prom seasons. The long-lasting bouquet is the most popular pick for several local proms, with the trend rapidly spreading to other campuses. Due to our capacity, this year we are offering exclusively tussie mussies, as well as boutonnieres, to our prom clients. Because prom season coincides with a busy wedding season, as well as Mother’s Day, we recommend placing orders early to take advantage of this popular trend.

 

 

Florals are in full bloom for spring and summer weddings. This season, not only will the bridal party be carrying flowers, they may be wearing them as well. One of the biggest fashion trends this season is floral prints, and brides are finding creative ways to incorporate the theme into their spring and summer nuptials. Feminine and romantic, flower patterns are perfect for outdoor weddings, but can really be used in any venue.

From sweet and subtle hints to bold patterns and hues, floral prints dominated the bridal runways this season. Some brides may choose to wear traditional white, while putting their attendants in patterned gowns. Other brides are abandoning tradition in favor of the flowery trend for their own gowns.

Even if you prefer to stick with solid white or ivory for the wedding dress, consider having a pretty floral shoe peeking out from beneath the hem.

Florals for the Men, Too

Floral prints aren’t just for the ladies. Grooms and groomsmen are sporting floral neckties and bow ties as well. Prints are easily paired with solid-colored suits and tuxedos, and do not have to match the ladies’ prints exactly. Choose smaller prints for a more formal look, or big, bold patterns for a more casual theme.

Mixing Fabric and Fresh Florals

If you are concerned about overpowering your guests with your floral theme, Lilium’s wedding coordinator and lead designer, Taylor Pritchett, suggests brides maintain a balance. “If the fabric print is subtle, fresh flower choices can add a pop of color. On the other hand, if the fabric has bold floral print, opt for a neutral pallete for bouquets and boutonnieres.”

If you envision a floral motif for your spring or summer wedding , let Lilium design the perfect fresh bouquets, boutonnieres and arrangements to complement your flower-themed attire.

Taylor Pritchett, Lilium’s lead floral designer, was named the ‘People’s Choice’ winner at the 2017 Texas Designer of the Year Competition held on January 21. The contest was conducted by the Texas State Florists’ Association (TSFA), and held at the Dallas Market Center’s International Trade Plaza.

TIMED CHALLENGES

This year’s theme was ‘Imagination/Innovation’. Designers were asked to participate in three timed challenges with this theme in mind. The first challenge was an interpretive design capturing the essence of a quote by Albert-Laszlo Barabasi, “Imagination is at the heart of all innovation.” Prior to the competition, designers created a prop or container that would provide the base of their design. The flowers and supplies, as well as other creative elements, were provided by the TSFA, and were not revealed until the day of competition. Designers were given 45 minutes to complete their designs with the materials provided.

For the second challenge, designers had 30 minutes to create a holiday arrangement using an inspiration board provided by the Dallas Market Center. Again, the flowers and supplies, as well as the containers, were provided by the TSFA.

In the third and final challenge, designers were presented an envelope outlining a surprise situation.  Designers were asked to provide samples for a bride planning a winter wedding. Designs were to include a bridal bouquet, a one-dozen rose arrangement for the groom to present in his proposal, a boutonniere, and wedding flowers for the mother of the bride. Competitors had one hour and 15 minutes to complete all four designs using flowers and materials provided.

JUDGING CRITERIA

TSFA judges scored designs in all three challenges based on:

  • Category Interpretation
  • Creativity
  • Scale and Proportion
  • Unity, Harmony and Texture
  • Physical and Visual Balance
  • Focal Emphasis
  • Line, Movement and Rhythm
  • Depth
  • Color Balance and Harmony
  • Professional Application Regarding Mechanics

Prizes were awarded for first, second and third place. In addition, a People’s Choice award was given based on votes cast by event attendees. Taylor, who was competing for the first time, tested her skills against 15 other floral designers from across the state of Texas. Taylor is certainly Lilium’s choice for best floral designer, and we are proud that others recognize that, too!  Congratulations, Taylor!

Tis the season for holiday parties. Office gatherings, neighborhood parties, luncheons, and church socials compete with school programs, shopping and baking to crowd our calendars this month. In the busyness that often marks the season, don’t forget to show appreciation to that special person who works to plan and pull together a successful holiday celebration: the host or hostess. You will be at the top of the guest list if you show up with a thoughtful gift in hand.

Look beyond the traditional bottle of wine, and consider these options:

Fresh Seasonal Arrangement

Fresh flowers add a festive touch for the party, and the host/hostess can enjoy them for days after the last guest leaves and the leftovers are stored. If you know the party’s theme, request complimentary colors. Is your host/hostess traditional, or have more modern taste? Christmastime is filled with traditions, but florals don’t have to be traditional. Stay within the red, white and green color pallet, or venture into jewel tones. Pick traditional favorites like roses and hydrangea, or step outside the Christmas box with unique tropicals. Adding fresh sprigs of seasonal greenery to the arrangement not only creates a holiday look, it provides subtle fragrances that are sure to put party guests in the holiday spirit. Colorful berries and pine cones are also in season, and add pops of color and texture to an arrangement. Other favorites include potted poinsettias and potted amaryllis, both dressed in festive containers.

Jar Candles and Diffusers In Scents of the Season

Fresh flowers are not the only way to spread holiday scents in a home or office. Lilium is proud to carry the Lafco line of essential oil-based candles and diffusers. The four top seasonal fragrances are Ski House, Tree, Opal Amaryllis and Golden Chestnut. The candles have an average burn time of 90 hours, and their hand-blown art glass containers can be reused long after the candle is burned. The diffuser, which comes in an art glass container with reeds and a bottle of oil for refilling,  is available in the Ski House fragrance.

Gift Baskets

Go the extra mile to show your appreciation to your holiday host/hostess with a gift basket. You might combine luscious Godiva chocolates, a fragrant candle, and fresh flowers, all dressed up for the season in a beautiful basket display. We can add fresh Christmas greens, berries, pine cones or other textures to create a visually stunning arrangement perfect for the gift-giving season.

Customized gift baskets might include Godiva chocolates, a Lafco candle, fresh seasonal flowers and greenery.

Let Lilium help you create a thoughtful gift for your holiday host/hostess this season. Call us at 817-481-1565 or visit our website, www.liliumflorals.com.